Lessons in Winter

I was supposed to have a group jumping lesson Wednesday night, but my cohorts bailed. Something about it being in the teens caused them to re-think their life goals, I guess.

I haven’t been riding the past two weeks anyway. I sat on Ava once for a short bit. That’s all. The rest of the time has been spent fighting with broken equipment, shoveling snow, and trying to keep my fingers from falling off while cleaning stalls.

Luckily, the lesson barn let me ride with the Thursday group lesson.  

And of course, Thursday was single digit temps…   I should’ve asked for a private lesson Wednesday.  😂 

Thursday’s group consists of three kids. All of whom were mute. I tried talking to one before the lesson,  but from her expression I am either an ax murderer,  or I have some seriously hideous visage which upset her.  

I’m using the term “kid”  loosely.  They appear to be allowed to drive,  so I assume they’re over 16. 

The instructor had mentioned a while ago that the Thursday class was a bit more advanced then the Wednesday class.  So I was really looking forward to testing my skills against better riders.  I guess I had assumed they’d all been jumping for years,  were knocking out 3 foot jumps,  and had mastered the basics of jumping by this point. 

Reality: they were a very,  very small step,  incrementally,  better then the group I ride with on Wednesdays.  But apparently just as unwilling to be the first one up,  the first one over, etc.  Bah. 

At one point the instructor gave us directions on the next exercise she wanted us to do,  and absolutely NO ONE MOVED.  She explains it again, expecting the kid at the front of the line to go when she undertsands what to do.  No one moves. 

I was at the end of the pack,  so I yelled out,  “Do you mean now?”  

“Yes,  now!”

No one moves… 

So, i pick up a trot and head to the front to start the exercise.  

Why does a middle aged,  fat,  out of shape lady gotta show the athletic,  young whipper snappers how it’s done?! 

That’s just sad…

Kids, don’t be the sad sack that lets old ladies show you up. 😁

One of the exercises had us jump a diagonal line,  but first and third jump were offset. So,  normally you’d do the straight line on the sides,  and the one on the diagonal.  This exercise we did the first jump off the straight line at a bit of an angle,  then the jump on the diagonal,  and third jump on the far straightline at a bit of an angle.  

Primitive cave man drawing of jump setup

I had to try that three times.  I’d get the pony set up on a bit of a diagonal line over the first jump, then try to bend her a bit more for the second jump,  but by that time the pony was like “NOPE!  We’re going around!”  We only had about a stride or two between the jumps.  Things happened QUICK! 

Third time,  I had a bit steeper angle over the first jump and began the approach to the second before we left the ground for the first,  and then I could angle her toward the middle of the second jump.  It all flowed smoothly after that.  Well,  sort of..  Pony did great.  I kind of just tried to stay out of the way, and I dropped the reins on the second jump.  Bad habit of mine.  Second the horse pulls I let the reins slide.  

Pony: “I’m going BIG!” 

Me: [Throws reins at horse] “Whatever you gotta do,  Pony.  Just don’t crash!” 

It was SO MUCH FUN!! 

I can’t wait to do it again! 

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3 thoughts on “Lessons in Winter

  1. We used to call jumping fences straight on that were set at odd angles “slicing” them. Kind of neat when you discover that you can really do that. Another good one (when you’re ready) is jumping a really narrow fence (a “skinny”). It’s easier than it looks…you just have to have good aim to begin with.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Lessons in Winter – Part 856,001+ | Avandarre In Dressage

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